Taiwan India business

Taiwan Delegation’s India Visit A Fresh Boost To Business Ties

Taiwan-India business ties got a fresh boost after a delegation from the self-governed island visited a number of Indian states earlier this month which led to the signing of three Taiwan-India memorandums of understanding aimed at fostering electronics manufacturing and green technologies, according to the Taiwan-based English-language website Common Wealth Magazine.

Several high-level business delegations from Taiwan Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers’ Association (TEEMA) and Taiwan India Business Association (TIBA) visited India to explore the untapped business potential between the two sides.
Writing for the Common Wealth Magazine, Taipei-based attorney Arpita Dutta said the three important items on the agenda of the delegation visit were: “visiting India based-Taiwanese businesses, visiting potential Indian business partners, and organizing a rigorous discussion with the state governments including the IT ministers of several states.”

According to Dutta, key takeaways from the delegation’s visit included, the recognition of the fact that India has an abundant talent pool and that wise use of Indian talent will maximize business growth.

The role of product localization in penetrating the 1.4 billion Indian market and the appropriate supply chain for streamlining business management, were also noted. Another theme that came across was the need to break the monotonous thinking of India-Taiwan cultural barriers.

Arpita Dutta, in the Common Wealth Magazine article, contended that this delegation visit was an essential step since it aimed to understand the gaps and opportunities to advocate the sustainability of Taiwanese business in a new jurisdiction.

She said intense and engaging talks with the “Indian government and Taiwanese companies surely will open doors to more collaboration in the foreseeable future.”

“The policies ‘Made in India’ and ‘Production Incentive Evolution’ along with several other subsidies can complement Taiwan’s ‘New Southbound Policy,’ and Taiwan-India collaboration will turn the aspiration of an Indian manufacturing hub into reality,” she added.

Dutta, who herself was part of the visit to prominent Indian entities, said the delegate saw their utmost collaborative lookout from a broad perspective, which clearly showed how India-Taiwan hardware and software collaboration will create a new dimension in the IT industry.

“The insights from this trip might provide sufficient confidence to Taiwanese companies that are under certain stereotypical impressions about India,” she added. (ANI)

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IIFA Awards 2023

IIFA Awards 2023 To Be Held In Abu Dhabi

After a successful award weekend in Abu Dhabi this year, The International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) is going to be back with awards in 2023 – again in Abu Dhabi!

The International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Weekend & Awards, which brings together the very best of the Indian film industry, is back by popular demand in Yas Island, Abu Dhabi, in February 2023 to win our hearts all over again! IIFA 2023 will be held in collaboration with the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi (DCT Abu Dhabi) and Miral.
The comeback of the 22nd edition of IIFA this year at Yas Island, Abu Dhabi, hosted by superstar Salman Khan, Riteish Deshmukh, and Maniesh Paul, featured electrifying performances by the finest talent from the Indian film fraternity, leaving us in awe with three memorable, star-studded days with packed venues filled by fans from all around the globe. More than 350 media attended the three-day awards weekend from 17 countries across the globe as more than 20,000 people thronged the arena.

IIFA 2023 will be a grand celebration of the best talent in Indian cinema, bringing together global dignitaries, international media, fans, and film enthusiasts worldwide. To present a greater opportunity for long-term impact in tourism, business & trade, and the film production business for the destination.

Noreen Khan, Vice President of IIFA said, “IIFA this year was an amazing experience thanks to the wonderful partners Miral & DCT. Coming back after two years we really worked hard to deliver the best of live entertainment again. The best part was the entire weekend delivered a positive experience to everyone who witnessed or experienced the event in any way. We have been inundated with unprecedented appreciation and comments of everyone truly has had a wonderful time this year in Abu Dhabi and so we are pleased and excited to bring it all back again but with much more magic to come next year”.

HE Saleh Mohamed Al-Geziry, Director General for Tourism at DCT Abu Dhabi, said: “We are honoured to once more welcome the IIFA Weekend & Awards to Etihad Arena. With the eyes of the world’s film industry upon us, we have an amazing opportunity to share with the world Abu Dhabi’s exciting nightlife, inspiring cultural experiences, and restorative escapes. The Awards in February can only enhance our reputation as a global centre for top-tier leisure, entertainment, and business events.” (ANI)

Read More:https://lokmarg.com/

DOING BUSINESS IN INDIA, EASIER BUT NOT AS EASY

DOING BUSINESS IN INDIA MAY BE EASIER BUT NOT AS EASY AS IT SHOULD BE The chest thumping that accompanied the Modi government’s celebration of India having moved up 30 positions on the World Bank’s Doing Business 2018 rankings was understandable because it came as a silver lining to what has generally been dismal economic news—a slowdown, sluggish job creation and dwindling investment, particularly in manufacturing. Then there were the controversies surrounding a hasty demonetisation policy and the introduction of a new bug-ridden goods and services tax system. In the context of these depressants, a 30-position gain on a survey as credible as World Bank’s may provide good reason for elation. It is also good reason to feel quite chuffed about. But India’s position on the ranking of 190 countries has to be viewed in another context—that of relativity. Its rank on that list does not owe only to how it fared on the 10 parameters or topics that World Bank employs to arrive at its rankings but equally on how others fared on them. World Bank’s Doing Business 2018 rankings are its 15th annual survey and is based on surveys of entrepreneurs in each country to gauge their assessment on aspects that include the ease with which one can start a business, get credit, register property, pay taxes, enforce contracts, and so on. Most of these are affected by reforms and changes in rules and law that governments introduce and it is to India’s credit that some of the changes brought about by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government have had their impact on how India has fared in the survey. Programmes such as the Make In India campaign to encourage foreign and domestic investment in manufacturing by simplifying processes, StartupIndia to help facilitate setting up of small businesses, or even Skill India, which aims at equipping India’s vast population of youth with employable skills, are some initiatives that may have had an impact on how India fared on the World Bank rankings. However, India’s performance in the survey has to be viewed in a context that is relative to other economies. At No. 100, India is a market where it is easier to do business than it is in tiny countries such as Fiji and Haiti, less developed countries such as Namibia, Nigeria, Nepal, or Sri Lanka, and obviously risky destinations such as the West Bank & Gaza, Iran and Iraq. India could perhaps take credit for the fact that the ranking places it higher than it does Brazil, which at 125 is, like India, a part of the BRICS set of emerging economies, or that its neighbour and adversary, Pakistan, lags behind at 145 but the facts are that it is still way behind China (No. 78), with which it sometimes tries to benchmark itself, and that even Colombia, Indonesia, Chile and Turkey are places where it is easier to do business than it is in India. The point is that there is a long way to go. A close scrutiny of the World Bank survey shows that on some parameters India still languishes towards the bottom. Its system for granting permissions is still quite forbidding. On the ease of dealing with construction permits, it is ranked at 181 among the 190 countries covered. On the ease of property registration, which often involves myriad paperwork, it ranks 154. But perhaps most alarming is how entrepreneurs perceive the enforcement of contracts in India. The rule of law is often taken for granted in business-friendly economies but in India it can still pose a serious risk. On the World Bank’s ranking, India comes in at a low 164 rank on that parameter, certainly not a position that would enamour it to potential investors, particularly those who may have a choice of going elsewhere where contracts are enforced better. It is worth noting that the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business rankings come with some other sorts of surprises. A deep dive into the data reveals how on certain parameters, conventional beliefs get upturned. Take enforcement of contracts, for example. Among the 17 Indian cities covered by the survey, Hyderabad, Patna, Ludhiana and Guwahati rank higher than Mumbai, Delhi, Gurgaon, and Bangalore. And while it is easiest to start a business in Delhi (it ranks No. 1 among the 17 Indian cities ranked), Bangalore is No. 17, Mumbai 12 and Ahmedabad 14. Data can be sliced, diced and analysed ad infinitum but these two examples could point to the lack of uniformity across India: there are places in India where some aspects of doing business might be easier but other aspects might not. There is also the matter of perception. Well-packaged programmes that the Modi government has launched (viz. Make In India, Startup India, Skill India, etc.) also create hype and influence the perception of entrepreneurs who are respondents in surveys such as World Bank’s but in the end it is what changes actually happen in practice that matters. Anyone diving deep into the data behind the Doing Business 2018 report can see that the average time and cost it takes to negotiate the procedures, obtain permissions and licences can still weigh down entrepreneurial efforts in India. All of this implies that it may be early to celebrate India’s “business friendliness”. But it definitely marks the beginning of a journey. Once it is glitch-free, the new uniform nationwide tax system for goods and services ought to make it easier for businesses to grow; the move towards cashless transactions, which was triggered by demonetisation, will have benefits for trade and commerce in general; and a government that kick starts investment which, in turn, has a multiplier effect on the rest of the economy, would be a facilitator for business. The most important signal from India’s better showing on these rankings is an endorsement that things may have begun improving. For the government and its policy makers what that means is not just that India is on the right path to reform but that it must keep on following it. // ]]>

Illinois budget fix: Just leave bills ignored and unpaid

a $787 billion stimulus law that was passed that same day. Also, Mr. President talked foreign politics on that same occasion. He explained how well he will succeed in using diplomacy instead of Bush’s warmongering, strengthen old alliances and, all in all, spruce up US international image to a better one. He said: “living our values doesn’t make us weaker, it makes us safer and it makes us stronger.” Even GOPers were approving of the path POTUS has undertaken then…at least of the rhetorics style, which he so Hollywood-esquely told it in. Negotiations_about_Iranian_Nuclear_Program For me personally, 7 years later, all these is just a short summary of all the promises Mr. Obama failed to deliver to America’s doorstep. All the great plans that could have made him a truly Reforming President, were not completed and so the 44th President of US will most likely remain an “intermediate” part of American history. That is confirmed by President himself, as he now constantly compares himself (unfavorably) to truly great US leaders, like Lincoln or Franklin Delano Roosevelt. And I have to agree with him. And the funniest thing is probably that Obama still managed to accomplish pretty big steps during his Presidency. Such as the “Affordable Care Act” (Obamacare), or achieving some kind of ease of US image overseas (which, though, made us look weak now, instead of strong and intimidating before). Anyways, the way those great Presidents Obama mentions himself has changed the country is a great comparison. Like FDR, who was able to overcome the complete weakness of US federal government over private banks and financial sector in general, when dealing with the Great Depression. Or Lincoln, who held the bipartisan country together with a grip of a mountain grizzly bear. Remember the Republican response to Obama’s speech that day? One of the most famous ones was Bobby Jindal’s reaction. He just buoyed the stimulus plan that was just approved by the Congress. Even tried to mock it up, while objecting to spending “140 million US dollars for something vaguely called Volcano Monitoring…”. The irony is that next month after his words, the Alaskan volcano erupted (just as Obama’s intentions did) and covered the state for days with thick, 60000-foot ash and smoke cloud… rtr4uxkj As CNN reporter once said then, regarding GOP response to these wonderful, though unfulfilled ideas of Obama: “To come up at this moment in history with a stale, government-is-the-problem, we can’t trust the federal government—it’s just a disaster for the Republican Party.…in a moment when only the federal government is big enough to actually do stuff—to just ignore all that, and just say ‘government is a problem, corruption, earmarks, wasteful spending,’ it’s just a form of nihilism. It’s just not where the country is. It’s not where the future of the country is.” // ]]>

LA flight emergently lands as 6 onboard fall ill

a $787 billion stimulus law that was passed that same day. Also, Mr. President talked foreign politics on that same occasion. He explained how well he will succeed in using diplomacy instead of Bush’s warmongering, strengthen old alliances and, all in all, spruce up US international image to a better one. He said: “living our values doesn’t make us weaker, it makes us safer and it makes us stronger.” Even GOPers were approving of the path POTUS has undertaken then…at least of the rhetorics style, which he so Hollywood-esquely told it in. Negotiations_about_Iranian_Nuclear_Program For me personally, 7 years later, all these is just a short summary of all the promises Mr. Obama failed to deliver to America’s doorstep. All the great plans that could have made him a truly Reforming President, were not completed and so the 44th President of US will most likely remain an “intermediate” part of American history. That is confirmed by President himself, as he now constantly compares himself (unfavorably) to truly great US leaders, like Lincoln or Franklin Delano Roosevelt. And I have to agree with him. And the funniest thing is probably that Obama still managed to accomplish pretty big steps during his Presidency. Such as the “Affordable Care Act” (Obamacare), or achieving some kind of ease of US image overseas (which, though, made us look weak now, instead of strong and intimidating before). Anyways, the way those great Presidents Obama mentions himself has changed the country is a great comparison. Like FDR, who was able to overcome the complete weakness of US federal government over private banks and financial sector in general, when dealing with the Great Depression. Or Lincoln, who held the bipartisan country together with a grip of a mountain grizzly bear. Remember the Republican response to Obama’s speech that day? One of the most famous ones was Bobby Jindal’s reaction. He just buoyed the stimulus plan that was just approved by the Congress. Even tried to mock it up, while objecting to spending “140 million US dollars for something vaguely called Volcano Monitoring…”. The irony is that next month after his words, the Alaskan volcano erupted (just as Obama’s intentions did) and covered the state for days with thick, 60000-foot ash and smoke cloud… rtr4uxkj As CNN reporter once said then, regarding GOP response to these wonderful, though unfulfilled ideas of Obama: “To come up at this moment in history with a stale, government-is-the-problem, we can’t trust the federal government—it’s just a disaster for the Republican Party.…in a moment when only the federal government is big enough to actually do stuff—to just ignore all that, and just say ‘government is a problem, corruption, earmarks, wasteful spending,’ it’s just a form of nihilism. It’s just not where the country is. It’s not where the future of the country is.” // ]]>